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Bright Lights #12 - Dan Dillard - Giving Up the Ghost

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Two things every writer needs to do:
1) Write. This is a no-brainer.

2) Find your own voice. And what I mean by this is, don't write for the market. By the time you've finished your "Barry Popper and the Wizard's rock" story, Vampires are the new game in town. Or, Hunger Games. Write for yourself and to your own strengths, then have some faith that your audience will find you.

My next victim on the blog is Dan Dillard and he embodies these two important traits. A prolific writer, Dan has several books already available, with a new one coming out on June 1st. He also found his own voice, writing in a genre that he loves. And while he writes, he waits for his audience to find him...by following the blood trail...




Q - Hi Dan, tell me a little about your newest book.

The new novel is called "Giving Up The Ghost" and it will be available on Amazon (http://www.amazon.com/author/dandillard) June 1st...
It's part love story, part paranormal horror, part black c…

Gina West's Not-so-Hostile Takeover (Part 2)

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Read the first part of the interview here:PART ONE


...and now, the conclusion...


18. I know you love comics. How have they influenced your writing?

Look out…here comes the boring…

Comic books are deceptively complicated. Okay, perhaps not every story, but to create a story in around 26 pages takes a lot of work. The writer has to write as if this is your first ever issue of the comic you’ve just picked up while not boring the guy who’s been following it for a thousand years. Much like a television writer, they have to write to beats so that they end in a way that will make you pick up the next one. They also have to write to the strengths of the artists they work with. And it all has to fit into a picture or a speech bubble. I’d liken individual comic books to the chapters of a story, a long ongoing story, except in each chapter you have to introduce your main character over again and the chapter has to be a stand-alone story while being part of a longer arc.

Comics taught me about cr…